A Guide To Thailand Visas


Introduction

History
Types Of Visas
Legal Loopholes
Visa Run Services
Inconsistencies

90 Day Reporting
Overstaying
Deportation and Blacklisting
Re-entry Permit
Staying Long-Term
Updated 3 March 2008

Deportation And Blacklisting

Deportation is the ordering and removal of an individual from the country and blacklisting means that you are not only removed from the country but also barred from ever returning, usually for a period of 99 years.

For those who are deported Ė and this is not that common, usually there is no prohibition placed on returning to Thailand although the fact that you were deported will be listed in the Immigration computer AND there will be something stamped in your passport to that effect.  It should be noted that the Immigration authorities in most countries do not look at all fondly upon anyone who has been deported from any country for any reason whatsoever and it can have a negative effect on your ability to be granted a visa for, or even to enter, another country.

The most common reason for deportation is overstaying a visa.  This is far and away the most common reason.  The next most common reason is being found guilty of a crime in Thailand.  No matter how innocuous a crime may be, if you are found guilty, you are supposed to be automatically deported.  (This doesnít always happen, but it is supposed to.)

Curiously, deportation doesnít usually result in a prohibition period from re-entering the country as is the case in many Western countries where a person deported is often prohibited from returning for a period of 5 years.

It should be noted that if you are deported it is usually BACK TO YOUR HOME COUNTRY, but again, this doesnít always happen.

Blacklisting means that you are banned from ever entering Thailand again.  This is even less common and is exclusive to those who are considered dangerous to the country or who have been found guilty of a serious crime, served their time and then been released from the monkey house.  The most common cases of people being blacklisted are the high profile cases of foreign fugitives picked up in Thailand for alleged crimes in their home countries.

There was an interesting case just a few years back when a young Brit in a moment of mindlessness stole a towel from his hotel room and was caught upon checking out.  The hotel discovered it, called the police and pressed charges.  The Brit was charged with theft, found guilty, deported AND blacklisted.  It was a foolish thing to do but it was in all likelihood a moment of foolishness and one has to wonder whether he deserved to be blacklisted?

Many people agree that Thailand is a great country, a place where a lot of fun and enjoyment can be had.  With this in mind, no-one wants to be barred from returning to the country so you really should be on your best behaviour.